TriNug – Web API Code Samples

Thanks to everyone who attended my ASP.NET Web API presentation last week at the TriNug user group. Over 100 people at the presentation with standing room only, TriNug has truly built an amazing user group with enthusiastic members who asked engaging questions during the entire presentation. I really enjoyed my time there and look forward to returning in the future. Code samples and PowerPoint can be found here....


New Pluralsight Course: .NET Micro ORMs

I'm pleased to announce that my latest Pluralsight course has been released: .NET Micro ORMs. If you're looking for an ORM that is simple, lightweight, and still lightening fast, then this course if for you. I start the course with a discussion of what a Micro ORM is and why you might want to use one. I also layout some of the common counter-arguments you hear against using a Micro ORM and examine the validity of each one. There are many great open source Micro ORMs available today and it was not easy deciding which ones to include in the course. Ultimately, I included the following (each with its own module) based on their features and popularity: Several of the...


Fun With the Chrome JavaScript Console and the Pluralsight Website

I'm currently working on my third course for Pluralsight. Everyone already knows that Scott Allen is a "dominating force" for Pluralsight but I was curious how many courses other authors have published as well. The Pluralsight Authors page - http://pluralsight.com/training/Authors – shows all 146 authors and you can click on any author's page to see how many (and which) courses they have authored. The problem is: I don't want to have to click into 146 pages to get a count for each author. With this in mind, I figured I could write a little JavaScript using the Chrome JavaScript console to do some "detective work." My first step was to figure out how the HTML was structured...



An Editor Pattern for Knockout.js Using TypeScript Inheritance

A few months back, Ryan Niemeyer posted about a simple editor pattern for Knockout.js (anyone doing any significant Knockout development should be subscribing to his blog). Historically, I have used the "protected observable" which Ryan outlined in a post in 2011. In short, there are times when you are typing in a value and you need to ability to be able to "accept" or "cancel" user changes. The idea is that in addition the the observables for your object, you have 3 methods: 1) update() – which stores the latest values in a "local cache", 2) revert() – which reverts the entire object back to the previous state, and 3) commit() which updates the "local cache" to the latest state. The...


dotnetConf Code Samples

Thanks to everyone to attended my presentation on Web API at dotnetConf. It was a great virtual conference and I hope to participate in more of them in the future. Code samples and PowerPoint for my presentation can all be found here....


Teach Your Kid to Code – BaltoMSDN

This Wednesday my son and I will be presenting "Teach Your Kid to Code" at BaltoMSDN. We did this presentation in November at CMAP and had a great turnout! We hope to see you (and your child!) on Wednesday night! This is the presentation abstract: Have you ever wanted a way to teach your kid to code? For that matter, have you ever wanted to simply be able to explain to your kid what you do for a living? Putting things in a context that a kid can understand is not as easy as it sounds. If you are someone curious about these concepts, this is a "can't miss" presentation that will be co-presented by Justin Michelotti (5th grader) and...